RSS

Category Archives: Holidays

Happy Birthday, John Wesley

wesley-quote1787

A UMNS Commentary by the Rev. Robert J. Williams

As John Wesley, the founder of the Methodist movement, grew older, he frequently commented on his birthday how he was still in good health and this was largely due to the way God had blessed him.Wesley was born on June 17, 1703, while England was still using the Julian calendar. England adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1752 and thus Wesley’s birth date became June 28.His birthday reflections give us a glimpse into how he viewed his life, health and ministry. On June 28, 1770, he wrote:

I can hardly believe that I am this entered into the sixty-eighth year of my age! How marvelous are the ways of God! How has he kept me, even from a child! From ten to thirteen or fourteen, I had little but bread to eat, and not great plenty of that. I believe this was so far from hurting me that it laid the foundation to lasting health. When I grew up, in consequence of reading Dr. Cheyne, I chose to eat sparingly and drink water. This was another great means of continuing my health, till I was about seven and twenty…; (He then speaks of various ailments.); Since that time, I have known neither pain nor sickness, and am now healthier than I was forty years ago! This hath God wrought!

He started to set a pattern for indicating his age and his good health. One year later, he wrote:

This day I entered the sixty-ninth year of my age. I am still a wonder to myself. My voice and strength are the same as at nine and twenty. This also hath God wrought.

In 1774, he wrote:

This being my birthday, the first day of my seventy-second year, I was considering. How is this, that I find just the same strength as I did thirty years ago? That my sight is considerably better now and my nerves firmer than there were then? That I have none of the infirmities of old age and have lost several I had in my youth? The grand cause is the good pleasure of God, who doth whatsoever pleaseth him. The chief means are: (1) My constantly rising at four, for about fifty years. (2) My generally preaching at five in the morning, one of the most healthy exercises in the world. (3) My never travelling less, by sea or land, than four thousand five hundred miles in a year.

In the intervening 10 years, he repeated these sentiments numerous times, and even in 1784, he wrote:

Today I entered on my eighty-second year and found myself just as strong to labour, and as fit for any exercise of body or mind, as I was forty years ago. I do not impute this to second causes, but to the sovereign Lord of all…; I am as strong at eighty-one, as I was at twenty-one, but abundantly more healthy, being a stranger to the head-ache, tooth-ache, and other bodily disorders which attended me in my youth. We can only say ‘The Lord reigneth’ While we live, let us live to him!

In 1788, after praising God “for a thousand spiritual blessings,” Wesley listed as questions what may be some of the “inferior means” for achieving such good health into old age.

To my constant exercise and change of air? To my never having lost a night’s sleep, sick or well at land or at sea, since I was born? To my having sleep at command, so that whenever I feel myself almost worn out, I call it and it comes, day or night? To my having constantly, for above sixty years, risen at four in the morning? To my constant preaching at five in the morning for above fifty years? To my having had so little pain in my life and so little sorrow or anxious care?

Finally, on June 28, 1790, less than a year before his death, he wrote:

This day I enter into my eighty-eighth year. For above eighty-six years, I found none of the infirmities of old age: my eyes did not wax dim, neither was my natural strength abated. But last August, I found almost a sudden change. My eyes were so dim that no glasses would help me. My strength likewise now quite forsook me and probably will not return in this world. But I feel no pain from head to foot, only it seems nature is exhausted and, humanly speaking, will sink more and more, till ‘The weary springs of life stand still at last.’

As this remarkable man aged, he reflected on God’s blessings and how his lifestyle contributed to his good health. This is but a brief glimpse into his humanity and can call on us to do likewise on our birthdays.

Editor’s Note: This story was first published on June 25, 2012.

*Williams is the top executive of the United Methodist Commission on Archives and History in Madison, N.J.

From http://www.umc.org/news-and-media/marking-john-wesleys-birthday-in-his-words

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 28, 2019 in Holidays, Posts of Interest

 

Tags: , ,

Common Ground Setlist for June 16, 2019

 

 

Tags: ,

June 16 is Trinity Sunday

 

Trinity Sunday is celebrated on the Sunday after Pentecost, reminding us of the three different ways we experience the one God whom we worship. We worship God the Creator; we worship Jesus who experienced the life of a human; and we worship the way that God works within us – the Holy Spirit.

Join Pender in celebrating this special Sunday.

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on June 14, 2019 in Holidays, Pender UMC, Posts of Interest

 

Tags:

Father’s Day

 

Turn your Father’s Day shopping into a force for good. Shop at smile.amazon.com/ch/54-0856924 and Amazon donates to Pender United Methodist Church.

 

Tags: , ,

Memorial Day 2019

memorial-day

 

 

A UMNS Report by Barbara Dunlap-Berg*

From sea to shining sea, United Methodists are finding special ways to observe Memorial Day in the United States. Here is a sampling of ideas.

  1. Pray for all who have given their lives for our freedom. “The major emphasis of the Memorial Day worship time,” said the Rev. Alan Brown, Hayes Memorial United Methodist Church, Fremont, Ohio, “is not on a secular observance; rather, it is the message of the gospels and the sacraments of the church.”
  2. Read the names of fallen veterans, and toll a bell after each name is read. The Rev. Walter L. Graves encourages people to read the names when they see a war memorial. “Remember,” said the pastor of Reelsboro United Methodist Church, New Bern, N.C., “that was a person who had… dreams and desires.”
  3. Provide special worship music with a PowerPoint presentation. “My church has a slide show of friends and family, living and dead, who have served in the military,” reported Leslie Haggs, lay leader at Angelica United Methodist Church in New York.
  4. Offer a candlelight service. Bishop James Swanson of the Holston Annual (regional) Conference will preach at joint services of three congregations — Mount Wesley and New Victory, Telford, Tenn., and Mayberry, Jonesborough, Tenn. A candlelight service for those interred in the church cemetery will be part of worship.
  5. Wave a flag. Youth of First United Methodist Church, Koppel, Pa., raised money to buy an American flag for all 225 residences in the little town. “I’m a flag-waver,” admitted the Rev. Donald A. Anderson. Quoted in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, he expressed hope that the flags would “bring Koppel a sense of pride in participating in this great holiday honoring those who fought to protect our freedoms.”

    At Arlington (Va.) National Cemetary, flags decorate the tombs of those who died in the service of their country. Photo courtesy of Arlington National Cemetery.

    At Arlington (Va.) National Cemetary, flags decorate the tombs of those who died in the service of their country. Photo courtesy of Arlington National Cemetery.

  6. Lay a wreath. In Illinois, Malta United Methodist Church will have a special worship service. The congregation invites veterans of the community to pay tribute to fellow soldiers by marching as a unit from the church to the township library, where a wreath will be dedicated.
  7. Decorate veterans’ graves. “After Sunday service,” said the Rev. Charlie Johnson Jr., a local pastor serving three congregations in the Lynchburg, Va., area, “we go into the church cemetery, remove the old flags placed on the graves of veterans last Memorial Day and replace them with new ones…We remember our active-duty military every Sunday during prayer.”
  8. Do a project for active troops. In Maine, the North Searsport United Methodist Church is recruiting the community to join parishioners in a mission project to benefit soldiers going overseas. Participants will sew small pillows for military personnel. The project is in response to recent articles about soldiers having to pay for pillows on their flights.
  9. Make military care packages.  The congregation of First United Methodist Church, Alice, Texas, brought items for military care packages to mail to troops serving overseas. “Many of us have loved ones who are serving in the military,” member Stefany Simmons explained. “Each of us signed cards to include for the troops.”
  10. Be part of a community-service day. Manatee United Methodist Church is one of two Bradenton, Fla., locations for the Journey of Remembrance, an annual community-service day honoring U.S. military veterans and their families for their care and sacrifice.

    Parades are one way to honor those who sacrifice daily for our freedom. A web-only photo by Dee Dee Cobb.

    Parades are one way to honor those who sacrifice daily for our freedom. A web-only photo by Dee Dee Cobb.

  11. Learn about issues affecting veterans. At Christ United Methodist Church, Troy, N.Y., a guest speaker will focus on the history and social justice issues related to military mental illness. “At Christ Church,” said the Rev. Nina Nichols in the Bennington Banner, “we honor those who serve their country, who served with the hope of bringing justice on behalf of our nation. But as a people of faith, we must not fail to call for a better way to peace than war. This Memorial Day we pray for peace for the war-weary.”
  12. Glorify Jesus as the Prince of Peace and reach out to those whom others may forget. On Memorial Day – as he does throughout the year – John Alexander, a member of East Lake United Methodist Church, Birmingham, Ala., will be involved with Kairos Prison Ministries. A Christian, lay-led, ecumenical, volunteer, international prison ministry, Kairos brings Christ’s love and forgiveness to incarcerated individuals and their families.

*Dunlap-Berg is internal content editor for United Methodist Communications.

News media contact: Barbara Dunlap-Berg, Nashville, Tenn., 615-742-5470 ornewsdesk@umcom.org.

From http://www.umc.org/news-and-media/twelve-ways-to-observe-memorial-day

 

Tags: , , , , , ,

Easter Sunday is Coming to PenderUMC

 

 

Easter Worship Services — April 21:

  • 8:15 am Traditional Worship with Organ, Brass Quartet & Choir (in the Sanctuary)
    Of course it is no surprise that this Sunday is EASTER! And we all know there will be flowers and brass and triumphant music and favorite hymns and excited children and dressed-up adults and both Alleluias and Hallelujahs and even rumors of an empty grave and eternal life . . . and there will be a story that reminds us of what we are celebrating. And just because it is no surprise to you, doesn’t mean there is not someone in your circle of acquaintances for whom our Easter Celebration might be a wonderful new thing to experience! Remember that part of the story? – when Mary saw the empty tomb, she ran to tell her friends Peter and John. Let’s do the same and have a great Easter together.
  • 9:30 am Contemporary Worship with Live Band (in the Fellowship Hall)
    Many of us love all the traditions of Easter, including the flowers, music and dressing up in our Easter best! We can worship in various ways though, including this informal service where you might see folks wearing anything from shorts and t-shirts to dresses, suits and ties. Feel free to grab a cup of coffee in our lobby and bring it in with you. Our worship is led with guitars and drums, and you might even recognize a song or two from the Christian radio station! We’ll share the Easter story, and talk about its significance for us today. This is a great opportunity to invite a friend, neighbor, or coworker. Let them know you’re saving a seat for them as we save a seat for you!
  • 11:00 am Traditional Worship with Organ, Brass Quartet & Choir (in the Sanctuary)
    Of course it is no surprise that this Sunday is EASTER! And we all know there will be flowers and brass and triumphant music and favorite hymns and excited children and dressed-up adults and both Alleluias and Hallelujahs and even rumors of an empty grave and eternal life . . . and there will be a story that reminds us of what we are celebrating. And just because it is no surprise to you, doesn’t mean there is not someone in your circle of acquaintances for whom our Easter Celebration might be a wonderful new thing to experience! Remember that part of the story? – when Mary saw the empty tomb, she ran to tell her friends Peter and John. Let’s do the same and have a great Easter together.
Childcare:


Easter Sunday Services
:  On Easter, Sunday April 21, there will be no Sunday School so that families can worship the risen Christ together. There will be a Nursery and another room for 3-5 year olds open at the 8:15, 9:30, and 11 o’clock services. If you have any questions please contact Elizabeth.”

 

What do you mean by Traditional-Blended or Contemporary worship?

We understand that people have different styles for connecting with God in a meaningful and personal way. Pender offers two styles: Traditional-Blended and Contemporary. You will discover the people who attend these worship services are varied in age.

Traditional-Blended is largely traditional in flavor from a wonderful organ and beautiful hymns, choral, orchestra, children’s or bell music and traditional surroundings in our main sanctuary. Mrs. Theresa Carpenter leads the choir, and several servant volunteers are involved. During these services there is a time for the children on the altar steps at the front, and all children are invited to enjoy!

Contemporary worship is led by our praise band in a rock-and-roll style with many contemporary Christian songs that you might hear on the radio.  Pastor Catharine delivers the message, often enhanced with video or drama.  Our contemporary worship services are more casual in nature, so wear your jeans or shorts if you want to.

Come for this Easter’s Traditional Worship to experience special music (Handel’s Hallelujah Chorus) and a special message brought by Pastor Catharine. 

Come for this Easter’s Contemporary Worship to experience great rock-style music and a special message brought by Pastor Catharine.  Our contemporary worship service is called “Common Ground” and is offered at 9:30 every Sunday, including Easter!

All of our worship is Christ-centered, Biblically-minded and relevant to life today. Pender UMC desires that you feel God’s Spirit nurturing you and that in worship you experience the very real presence of Christ with us. May you be blessed by God as you gather with us.

Where do I enter the building?
First, we want you to know that our church has worked hard to create a building with access for all. Whether you find yourself in a wheelchair or carting babies in a buggy, you’ll find automatically opening doors and large entrances.

As you enter the parking lot, you will notice two doors, both under porticos so that you may get out of the rain if it is wet. To enter through the main sanctuary entrance doors, simply look for the semi-circular driveway.

If you enter the sliding glass doors entrance, make a left into the hallway to the end where you will notice the welcome area on your left.

What do my children do?
We invite older children (3rd grade and up) to become fully involved in worship. At the back of the sanctuary are “children’s bulletins” and supplies like crayons.

Our younger children have the option of remaining with their family or being cared for by our wonderful nursery and childcare staff. Childcare is available for children ages birth through 2nd grade in the lower level of our building. Ask an Usher to help you find where to take your children!

On Easter, Sunday April 21, there will be no Sunday School so that families can worship the risen Christ together. There will be a Nursery and another room for 3-5 year olds open at the 8:15, 9:30, and 11 o’clock services. If you have any questions please contact Elizabeth.”

Where do I park?
We attempt to have plenty of parking on Easter morning for our guests. However, we suggest you plan to arrive early, and if parking is full on our lot, there is parking on the street.

What if I need further information?
Our friendly volunteers and staff will welcome your questions! Please call our church office at 703-278-8023 between 9 am and 3 pm, Monday through Friday. Once at Pender, ask any friendly face for help! We are here to assist you.

Easter Offering:
Our Easter Offering this year will support:

 

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Palm Sunday is Tomorrow!

palm-sunday

 

The days leading up to Easter often have an understandably somber feel to them, particularly as we contemplate Jesus’ arrest, trial, and execution. It’s easy to forget that the week begins with a joyful event: the Triumphal Entry!

Sunday, March 14, 2019, is Palm Sunday, the first day of Holy Week. On Palm Sunday, we commemorate Jesus’ celebrated entry into Jerusalem just a few days before his arrest, trial, and crucifixion.

The “palm” in Palm Sunday refers to the palm branches waved by the adoring Jerusalem crowds who welcomed Jesus and proclaimed him King. The event is commonly referred to as the Triumphal Entry. Here’s the account from Matthew 21:1-11:

As they approached Jerusalem and came to Bethphage on the Mount of Olives, Jesus sent two disciples, saying to them, “Go to the village ahead of you, and at once you will find a donkey tied there, with her colt by her. Untie them and bring them to me. If anyone says anything to you, say that the Lord needs them, and he will send them right away.”

This took place to fulfill what was spoken through the prophet:

“Say to Daughter Zion,
‘See, your king comes to you,
gentle and riding on a donkey,
and on a colt, the foal of a donkey.’”

The disciples went and did as Jesus had instructed them. They brought the donkey and the colt and placed their cloaks on them for Jesus to sit on. A very large crowd spread their cloaks on the road, while others cut branches from the trees and spread them on the road. The crowds that went ahead of him and those that followed shouted,

“Hosanna to the Son of David!”

“Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!”

“Hosanna in the highest heaven!”

When Jesus entered Jerusalem, the whole city was stirred and asked, “Who is this?”

The crowds answered, “This is Jesus, the prophet from Nazareth in Galilee.”

From Chuck Knows Church — Palm Sunday. Have you ever waved a palm branch in a worship service? If so, do you know why? Chuckle along and learn about Palm Sunday with Chuck

Holy week at Pender

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: