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Tag Archives: Book of Discipline

2014 Lay Servant Class

lay-servant

Bi-District Lay Servant Ministries Training for 2014:

Lay Servant Ministries Training at Great Falls UMC on March 28-29, 2014. This event, open to all (Alexandria and Arlington Districts) is a 2-day training that will offer either the Basic training or UM Polity. Info about texts etc will be posted shortly. To register on line with your credit card, please click here.

Click here for mail in registration for this event.

What Is Lay Servant Ministries?

 

To all Lay Speakers: The 2012 General Conference of The United Methodist Church adopted several resolutions that have changed both the name and scope of Lay Speaking Ministries to Lay Servant Ministries. The term “lay speaker” had developed the connotation of preaching and, for this reason, many potential leaders had avoided the leadership training that could develop their skills and enhance their spiritual gifts. We are called to be servants of Jesus Christ and servant leaders; therefore the name Lay Servant and Lay Servant Ministries seems very appropriate for this ministry of leading, caring and communicating. See Current Flyer in attachments.

What happens now? Effective immediately, if you are already a Local Church Lay Speaker, you will automatically become a Local Church Lay Servant. If you are already a Certified Lay Speaker, you will become a Certified Lay Servant. You will still have the same requirements for turning in an Annual Report to your local charge conference and continuing education requirements. The General Conference also adopted a new position of Lay Speaker within the Lay Servant Ministries program. This will have stricter training requirements than in the past. See word documentation on certification.

What is Lay Servant Ministries? Lay servant ministry is a United Methodist system for lay leadership development. The basic and advanced courses are designed to help persons develop their skills in leadership, communication, and care-giving. Participating in this training as it is offered helps you build relationships with other lay leaders. In this way you increase opportunity for yourself and for your congregation to be in ministry with others, your credibility as a leader is enhanced.

According to the The Book of Discipline, a lay servant is a professing member of a local church or charge conference who is “ready and desirous to serve the Church and who is well informed on and committed to the Scriptures and the doctrine, heritage, organization and life of The United Methodist Church.” A lay servant “has received specific training to develop skills in witnessing to the Christian faith through spoken communication, church and community leadership, and care-giving ministries.”

Downloadable Resources

Request for Lay Speaker 2013

Lay Servant Certification Process as of March 2013

Lay Servant Requirements as of March 2013

Lay Servant/Lay Speaker Record

Lay Speaker Profile Sheet 2013

Lay Servant Report to Conference – writeable pdf

Lay Speaker’s Report to Charge Conference Form 19

Arlington District LSM Overview as of April 2013

Lay Speaking – Presentation Feedback Form March 2013

GBOD brochure for Lay Servant Ministries

 
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Posted by on March 24, 2014 in Get Involved!, Pender UMC

 

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2014 Lay Servant Class

lay-servant

Bi-District Lay Servant Ministries Training for 2014:

Lay Servant Ministries Training at Great Falls UMC on March 28-29, 2014. This event, open to all (Alexandria and Arlington Districts) is a 2-day training that will offer either the Basic training or UM Polity. Info about texts etc will be posted shortly. To register on line with your credit card, please click here.

Click here for mail in registration for this event.

 

What Is Lay Servant Ministries?

 

To all Lay Speakers: The 2012 General Conference of The United Methodist Church adopted several resolutions that have changed both the name and scope of Lay Speaking Ministries to Lay Servant Ministries. The term “lay speaker” had developed the connotation of preaching and, for this reason, many potential leaders had avoided the leadership training that could develop their skills and enhance their spiritual gifts. We are called to be servants of Jesus Christ and servant leaders; therefore the name Lay Servant and Lay Servant Ministries seems very appropriate for this ministry of leading, caring and communicating. See Current Flyer in attachments.

What happens now? Effective immediately, if you are already a Local Church Lay Speaker, you will automatically become a Local Church Lay Servant. If you are already a Certified Lay Speaker, you will become a Certified Lay Servant. You will still have the same requirements for turning in an Annual Report to your local charge conference and continuing education requirements. The General Conference also adopted a new position of Lay Speaker within the Lay Servant Ministries program. This will have stricter training requirements than in the past. See word documentation on certification.

What is Lay Servant Ministries? Lay servant ministry is a United Methodist system for lay leadership development. The basic and advanced courses are designed to help persons develop their skills in leadership, communication, and care-giving. Participating in this training as it is offered helps you build relationships with other lay leaders. In this way you increase opportunity for yourself and for your congregation to be in ministry with others, your credibility as a leader is enhanced.

According to the The Book of Discipline, a lay servant is a professing member of a local church or charge conference who is “ready and desirous to serve the Church and who is well informed on and committed to the Scriptures and the doctrine, heritage, organization and life of The United Methodist Church.” A lay servant “has received specific training to develop skills in witnessing to the Christian faith through spoken communication, church and community leadership, and care-giving ministries.”

 

Downloadable Resources

Request for Lay Speaker 2013

Lay Servant Certification Process as of March 2013

Lay Servant Requirements as of March 2013

Lay Servant/Lay Speaker Record

Lay Speaker Profile Sheet 2013

Lay Servant Report to Conference – writeable pdf

Lay Speaker’s Report to Charge Conference Form 19

Arlington District LSM Overview as of April 2013

Lay Speaking – Presentation Feedback Form March 2013

GBOD brochure for Lay Servant Ministries

 
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Posted by on March 17, 2014 in Get Involved!, Pender UMC

 

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A Traveler’s Guide to the Heritage Landmarks of The United Methodist Church

old-stone-church

 

PDF Version

By action of the 2012 General Conference, there are currently forty-six Heritage Landmarks of The United Methodist Church. Five new Heritage Landmarks were designated by the General Conference with three outside the United States. These are in the Philippines, Zimbabwe, and Liberia. The Book of Discipline defines a Heritage Landmark as “a building, location, or structure specifically related to significant events, developments, or personalities in the overall history of The United Methodist Church or its antecedents.”

The Heritage Landmarks of United Methodism remind us of those people and events that have shaped our history. They are tangible reminders of our heritage and their preservation helps keep our denominational legacy alive. For further information about the forty-six Heritage Landmarks or to learn how a place becomes so designated, please contact the General Secretary, General Commission on Archives and History, P.O. Box 127, Madison, NJ 07940 or email rwilliams@gcah.org.

Material in this guide may be copied by local churches, Heritage Landmarks, and other agencies of The United Methodist Church without further approval.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Introduction: Look to the rock from which you were hewn… The United Methodist Story in its Heritage Landmarks

Heritage Landmarks:

ALABAMA
Asbury Manual Labor School/Mission, Fort Mitchell

DELAWARE
Barratt’s Chapel and Museum, Frederica

FLORIDA
Bethune-Cookman College/Foundation, Daytona Beach

GEORGIA
Town of Oxford, Oxford
John Wesley’s American Parish, Savannah
St. Simons Island, St. Simons Island
Wesleyan College Cluster, Macon

ILLINOIS
Peter Cartwright Church, Pleasant Plains
Wesley Foundation, University of Illinois, Champaign

KENTUCKY
Site of the Organization of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, Louisville

MAINE
Cox Memorial United Methodist Church, Hallowell

MARYLAND
Old Otterbein Church, Baltimore
Robert Strawbridge House, New Windsor
Cokesbury College Site, Abingdon
Lovely Lane Meetinghouse Site, Baltimore
United Brethren Founding Sites Cluster, Frederick and Washington Counties

MASSACHUSETTS
Woman’s Foreign Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Boston

MISSOURI
Old McKendree Chapel, near Jackson

NEW YORK
John Street Church, New York City
New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn

NORTH CAROLINA
Green Hill House, Louisburg
Whitaker’s Chapel, Enfield

OHIO
Bishop John Seybert/Flat Rock Cluster, near Flat Rock
Hanby House, Westerville
Wyandott Indian Mission, Upper Sandusky

OKLAHOMA
Newtown Indian United Methodist Church, Okmulgee

OREGON
Willamette Mission Site, near Salem

PENNSYLVANIA
Albright Chapel, Kleinfeltersville
Boehm’s Chapel, Willow Street
First Church Building and Publishing House, Evangelical Association, New Berlin
First United Methodist Church, Johnstown
Isaac Long’s Barn, Landis Valley, Lititz
St. George’s Church, Philadelphia
Simpson House “Olde Main Building,” Philadelphia
Zoar United Methodist Church, Philadelphia

SOUTH DAKOTA
Deadwood Cluster, Deadwood

TENNESSEE
Acuff’s Chapel, Blountville
Edward Cox House, Bluff City

TEXAS
McMahan Chapel, San Augustine
Rutersville Cluster, Rutersville

VIRGINIA
Keywood Marker, Glade Spring
Old Stone Church Site, Leesburg

WEST VIRGINIA
Rehoboth Church and Museum, Union

LIBERIA
College of West Africa, Monrovia

PHILIPPINES
Mary Johnston Hospital, Manila

ZIMBABWE
Old Mutare Mission

UNITED METHODIST HISTORIC SITES

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on June 22, 2013 in Posts of Interest

 

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