RSS

Tag Archives: Jerusalem

Palm Sunday is Tomorrow!

palm-sunday

 

The days leading up to Easter often have an understandably somber feel to them, particularly as we contemplate Jesus’ arrest, trial, and execution. It’s easy to forget that the week begins with a joyful event: the Triumphal Entry!

Sunday, March 14, 2019, is Palm Sunday, the first day of Holy Week. On Palm Sunday, we commemorate Jesus’ celebrated entry into Jerusalem just a few days before his arrest, trial, and crucifixion.

The “palm” in Palm Sunday refers to the palm branches waved by the adoring Jerusalem crowds who welcomed Jesus and proclaimed him King. The event is commonly referred to as the Triumphal Entry. Here’s the account from Matthew 21:1-11:

As they approached Jerusalem and came to Bethphage on the Mount of Olives, Jesus sent two disciples, saying to them, “Go to the village ahead of you, and at once you will find a donkey tied there, with her colt by her. Untie them and bring them to me. If anyone says anything to you, say that the Lord needs them, and he will send them right away.”

This took place to fulfill what was spoken through the prophet:

“Say to Daughter Zion,
‘See, your king comes to you,
gentle and riding on a donkey,
and on a colt, the foal of a donkey.’”

The disciples went and did as Jesus had instructed them. They brought the donkey and the colt and placed their cloaks on them for Jesus to sit on. A very large crowd spread their cloaks on the road, while others cut branches from the trees and spread them on the road. The crowds that went ahead of him and those that followed shouted,

“Hosanna to the Son of David!”

“Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!”

“Hosanna in the highest heaven!”

When Jesus entered Jerusalem, the whole city was stirred and asked, “Who is this?”

The crowds answered, “This is Jesus, the prophet from Nazareth in Galilee.”

From Chuck Knows Church — Palm Sunday. Have you ever waved a palm branch in a worship service? If so, do you know why? Chuckle along and learn about Palm Sunday with Chuck

Holy week at Pender

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Sunday is Palm Sunday

palm-sunday

 

The days leading up to Easter often have an understandably somber feel to them, particularly as we contemplate Jesus’ arrest, trial, and execution. It’s easy to forget that the week begins with a joyful event: the Triumphal Entry!

Sunday, March 20, 2016 is Palm Sunday, the first day of Holy Week. On Palm Sunday, we commemorate Jesus’ celebrated entry into Jerusalem just a few days before his arrest, trial, and crucifixion.

The “palm” in Palm Sunday refers to the palm branches waved by the adoring Jerusalem crowds who welcomed Jesus and proclaimed him King. The event is commonly referred to as the Triumphal Entry. Here’s the account from Matthew 21:1-11:

As they approached Jerusalem and came to Bethphage on the Mount of Olives, Jesus sent two disciples, saying to them, “Go to the village ahead of you, and at once you will find a donkey tied there, with her colt by her. Untie them and bring them to me. If anyone says anything to you, say that the Lord needs them, and he will send them right away.”

This took place to fulfill what was spoken through the prophet:

“Say to Daughter Zion,
‘See, your king comes to you,
gentle and riding on a donkey,
and on a colt, the foal of a donkey.’”

The disciples went and did as Jesus had instructed them. They brought the donkey and the colt and placed their cloaks on them for Jesus to sit on. A very large crowd spread their cloaks on the road, while others cut branches from the trees and spread them on the road. The crowds that went ahead of him and those that followed shouted,

“Hosanna to the Son of David!”

“Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!”

“Hosanna in the highest heaven!”

When Jesus entered Jerusalem, the whole city was stirred and asked, “Who is this?”

The crowds answered, “This is Jesus, the prophet from Nazareth in Galilee.”

From Chuck Knows Church — Palm Sunday. Have you ever waved a palm branch in a worship service? If so, do you know why? Chuckle along and learn about Palm Sunday with Chuck

Holy week at Pender

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Christ Is Risen! He Is Risen Indeed!

he-is-risen

The Paschal greeting is an Easter custom among many churches, including Pender UMC.

Instead of “hello” or its equivalent, one is to greet another person with “Christ is Risen!”, and the response is “He is Risen Indeed!” (Matthew 27:64, Matthew 28:6–7, Mark 16:6, Luke 24:6, Luke 24:34).

The week before Easter, known as Holy Week, is very special in the Christian tradition.

The Sunday before Easter is Palm Sunday. The last three days before Easter are Holy (Maundy) Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday.

Palm Sunday, Maundy Thursday and Good Friday respectively commemorate Jesus’ entry in Jerusalem, the Last Supper and the Crucifixion. Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday are sometimes referred to as the Easter Triduum (Latin for “Three Days”).

In some countries, Easter lasts two days, with the second called “Easter Monday”. The week beginning with Easter Sunday is called Easter Week or the Octave of Easter, and each day is prefaced with “Easter”, e.g. Easter Monday, Easter Tuesday, etc. Easter Saturday is therefore the Saturday after Easter Sunday. The day before Easter is properly called Holy Saturday.

Eastertide, the season of Easter, begins on Easter Sunday and lasts until the day of Pentecost, seven weeks later.

At Pender UMC on Sunday, April 5: Easter 

  • 6:00 am Sunrise Service
  • Easter Breakfast
  • 8:00 am Traditional Service
  • 9:30 am Contemporary Service
  • 9:30 am Traditional Service
  • 11:00 am Traditional Service
  • Easter plants are yours to take after the last service

What do you mean by Traditional-Blended or Contemporary worship?

We understand that people have different styles for connecting with God in a meaningful and personal way. Pender offers two styles: Traditional-Blended and Contemporary. You will discover the people who attend these worship services are varied in age.

Traditional-Blended is largely traditional in flavor from a wonderful organ and beautiful hymns, choral, orchestra, children’s or bell music and traditional surroundings in our main sanctuary. Mrs. Theresa Carpenter leads the choir, and several servant volunteers are involved. During these services there is a time for the children on the altar steps at the front, and all children are invited to enjoy!

Contemporary worship is led by our praise band in a rock-and-roll style with many contemporary Christian songs that you might hear on the radio.  Pastor Dan delivers the message, often enhanced with video or drama.  Our contemporary worship services are more casual in nature, so wear your jeans or shorts if you want to, Pastor Dan does!

Come for this Easter’s Traditional Worship to experience special music (Handel’s Hallelujah Chorus) and a special message brought by Pastor Kenny.  We All Gonna RiseI Corinthians 15:20-28 ; Mark 16:1-8 Easter isn’t just a celebration.  It’s a reminder of a coming action.  Because Christ was raised you and me are gonna be raised.  That’s right Easter isn’t just Christ’s story its also OUR story!  Let’s celebrate this Sunday!

Come for this Easter’s Contemporary Worship to experience great rock-style music and a special message brought by Pastor Kevin.  Our contemporary worship service is called “Common Ground” and is offered at 9:30 every Sunday, including Easter!  We All Gonna RiseI Corinthians 15:20-28 ; Mark 16:1-8 Easter isn’t just a celebration.  It’s a reminder of a coming action.  Because Christ was raised you and me are gonna be raised.  That’s right Easter isn’t just Christ’s story its also OUR story!  Let’s celebrate this Sunday!

All of our worship is Christ-centered, Biblically-minded and relevant to life today. Pender UMC desires that you feel God’s Spirit nurturing you and that in worship you experience the very real presence of Christ with us. May you be blessed by God as you gather with us.

Where do I enter the building?

First, we want you to know that our church has worked hard to create a building with access for all. Whether you find yourself in a wheelchair or carting babies in a buggy, you’ll find automatically opening doors and large entrances.

As you enter the parking lot, you will notice two doors, both under porticos so that you may get out of the rain if it is wet. To enter through the main sanctuary entrance doors, simply look for the semi-circular driveway.

If instead you enter the sliding glass doors entrance, make a left into the hallway to the end where you will notice the welcome area on your left.

What do my children do?

We invite older children (3rd grade and up) to become fully involved in worship. At the back of the sanctuary are “children’s bulletins” and supplies like crayons.

Our younger children have the option of remaining with their family or being cared for by our wonderful nursery and childcare staff. Childcare is available for children ages birth through 2nd grade in the lower level of our building. Ask an Usher to help you find where to take your children!

Where do I park?

We attempt to have plenty of parking on Easter morning for our guests. However, we suggest you plan to arrive early, and if parking is full on our lot, there is parking on the street.

What if I need further information?

Our friendly volunteers and staff will welcome your questions! Please call our church office at 703-278-8023 between 9 am and 3 pm, Monday through Friday. Once at Pender, ask any friendly face for help! We are here to assist you.

Related articles

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Pentecost is Sunday, June 8, 2014

pentecost320-crop

Pentecost is a Christian holy day that celebrates the coming of the Holy Spirit 40 days after Easter. Some Christian denominations consider it the birthday of the Christian church and celebrate it as such.

Originally, Pentecost was a Jewish holiday held 50 days after Passover. One of three major feasts during the Jewish year, it celebrated Thanksgiving for harvested crops. However, Pentecost for Christians means something far different.

Before Jesus was crucified, he told his disciples that the Holy Spirit would come after him:

And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Counselor to be with you forever — the Spirit of truth. The world cannot accept him, because it neither sees him nor knows him. But you know him, for he lives with you and will be in you. I will not leave you as orphans; I will come to you. John 14:16–18

And 40 days after Jesus was resurrected (10 days after he ascended into heaven), that promise was fulfilled when Peter and the early Church were in Jerusalem for Pentecost.

Sunday’s Sermon:

Holy Spirit – Power for the JourneyActs 2: 1-13

We belive in the Holy Spirit, the 3rd person of the Trinity who came on Pentecost and began the church.  What does the Holy Spirit do today?  How does the  Holy Spirit get and find Power?

The Holy Spirit Comes at Pentecost

2 When the day of Pentecost came, they were all together in one place. Suddenly a sound like the blowing of a violent wind came from heaven and filled the whole house where they were sitting. They saw what seemed to be tongues of fire that separated and came to rest on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues[a] as the Spirit enabled them.

Now there were staying in Jerusalem God-fearing Jews from every nation under heaven. When they heard this sound, a crowd came together in bewilderment, because each one heard their own language being spoken. Utterly amazed, they asked: “Aren’t all these who are speaking Galileans? Then how is it that each of us hears them in our native language? Parthians, Medes and Elamites; residents of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia,[b] 10 Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the parts of Libya near Cyrene; visitors from Rome 11 (both Jews and converts to Judaism); Cretans and Arabs—we hear them declaring the wonders of God in our own tongues!” 12 Amazed and perplexed, they asked one another, “What does this mean?”

13 Some, however, made fun of them and said, “They have had too much wine.”

Footnotes:

  1. Acts 2:4 Or languages; also in verse 11

  2. Acts 2:9 That is, the Roman province by that name

 

Seen any symbols of fire around your sanctuary?

Do you know what’s the second most important day of the Christian year?

Chuck messes with candles again and explains Pentecost.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Christ is Risen! He is Risen Indeed!

he-is-risen

The Paschal greeting is an Easter custom among many churches, including Pender UMC.

Instead of “hello” or its equivalent, one is to greet another person with “Christ is Risen!”, and the response is “He is Risen Indeed!” (Matthew 27:64, Matthew 28:6–7, Mark 16:6, Luke 24:6, Luke 24:34).

The week before Easter, known as Holy Week, is very special in the Christian tradition.

The Sunday before Easter is Palm Sunday. The last three days before Easter are Holy (Maundy) Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday.

Palm Sunday, Maundy Thursday and Good Friday respectively commemorate Jesus’ entry in Jerusalem, the Last Supper and the Crucifixion. Maundy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday are sometimes referred to as the Easter Triduum (Latin for “Three Days”).

In some countries, Easter lasts two days, with the second called “Easter Monday”. The week beginning with Easter Sunday is called Easter Week or the Octave of Easter, and each day is prefaced with “Easter”, e.g. Easter Monday, Easter Tuesday, etc. Easter Saturday is therefore the Saturday after Easter Sunday. The day before Easter is properly called Holy Saturday.

Eastertide, the season of Easter, begins on Easter Sunday and lasts until the day of Pentecost, seven weeks later.

At Pender UMC on Sunday, April 20: Easter – Wrap Your Arms Around Something Good for Easter. John 21:15-19
During Lent we gave up BAD things. Easter brings us to embrace the hope, forgiveness and possibilities God has for us because of a Risen Jesus!  Let’s wrap our arms around the living Christ and all He brings.

  • 6:00 am Sunrise Service
  • Easter Breakfast
  • 8:00 am Traditional Service
  • 9:30 am Contemporary Service
  • 9:30 am Traditional Service
  • 11:00 am Traditional Service
  • Easter plants are yours to take after the last service

What do you mean by Traditional-Blended or Contemporary worship?

We understand that people have different styles for connecting with God in a meaningful and personal way. Pender offers two styles: Traditional-Blended and Contemporary. You will discover the people who attend these worship services are varied in age.

Traditional-Blended is largely traditional in flavor from a wonderful organ and beautiful hymns, choral, orchestra, children’s or bell music and traditional surroundings in our main sanctuary. Mrs. Theresa Carpenter leads the choir, and several servant volunteers are involved. During these services there is a time for the children on the altar steps at the front, and all children are invited to enjoy!

Contemporary worship is led by our praise band in a rock-and-roll style with many contemporary Christian songs that you might hear on the radio.  Rev Kev delivers the message, often enhanced with video or drama.  Our contemporary worship services are more casual in nature, so wear your jeans or shorts if you want to, Rev Kev  does!

Come for this Easter’s Traditional Worship to experience special music (Handel’s Hallelujah Chorus) and a special message brought by Pastor Kenny.  Easter – Wrap Your Arms Around Something Good for Easter. John 21:15-19

During Lent we gave up BAD things. Easter brings us to embrace the hope, forgiveness and possibilities God has for us because of a Risen Jesus!  Let’s wrap our arms around the living Christ and all He brings. 

Come for this Easter’s Contemporary Worship to experience great rock-style music and a special message brought by Pastor Kevin.  Our contemporary worship service is called “Common Ground” and is offered at 9:30 every Sunday, including Easter!

All of our worship is Christ-centered, Biblically-minded and relevant to life today. Pender UMC desires that you feel God’s Spirit nurturing you and that in worship you experience the very real presence of Christ with us. May you be blessed by God as you gather with us.

Where do I enter the building?
First, we want you to know that our church has worked hard to create a building with access for all. Whether you find yourself in a wheelchair or carting babies in a buggy, you’ll find automatically opening doors and large entrances.

As you enter the parking lot, you will notice two doors, both under porticos so that you may get out of the rain if it is wet. To enter through the main sanctuary entrance doors, simply look for the semi-circular driveway.

If instead you enter the sliding glass doors entrance, make a left into the hallway to the end where you will notice the welcome area on your left.

What do my children do?
We invite older children (3rd grade and up) to become fully involved in worship. At the back of the sanctuary are “children’s bulletins” and supplies like crayons.

Our younger children have the option of remaining with their family or being cared for by our wonderful nursery and childcare staff. Childcare is available for children ages birth through 2nd grade in the lower level of our building. Ask an Usher to help you find where to take your children!

Where do I park?
We attempt to have plenty of parking on Easter morning for our guests. However, we suggest you plan to arrive early, and if parking is full on our lot, there is parking on the street.

What if I need further information?
Our friendly volunteers and staff will welcome your questions! Please call our church office at 703-278-8023 between 9 am and 3 pm, Monday through Friday. Once at Pender, ask any friendly face for help! We are here to assist you.

Related articles
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

March 2: Transfiguration Sunday

Transfiguration Sunday:  Why Do We Celebrate It Before Lent?

The background of this question lies in the differing practices of Christians in North America. United Methodists and many other denominations schedule the observance of the Transfiguration on the Sunday before Lent.

Why does the celebration of the Transfiguration take place just before Lent in United Methodist and other denominations that follow The Revised Common Lectionary?

The Book of Common Prayer collect for the Last Sunday after the Epiphany suggests why the Transfiguration of Our Lord is celebrated when it is:

O God, who before the passion of your only-begotten Son revealed his glory upon the holy mountain: Grant to us that we, beholding by faith the light of his countenance, may be strengthened to bear our cross, and be changed into his likeness from glory to glory; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.(Book of Common Prayer according to the use of the Episcopal Church, 1979, page 217. Book of Common Prayer is public domain material and is used here with gratitude to the Episcopal Church and Church Publishing.)

We celebrate the revelation of Christ’s glory “before the passion” so that we may “be strengthened to bear our cross and be changed into his likeness.” The focus of the Lenten season is renewed discipline in walking in the way of the cross and rediscovery of the baptismal renunciation of evil and sin and our daily adherence to Christ.

At Easter, which reveals the fullness of Christ’s glory (foreshadowed in the Transfiguration), Christians give themselves anew to the gospel at the Easter Vigil where they share the dying and rising of Christ.

In the biblical context, the synoptic gospels narrate the Transfiguration as a bridge between Jesus’ public ministry and his passion. From the time of the Transfiguration, Jesus sets his face to go to Jerusalem and the cross.

 

From Chuck Knows Church:

The Transfiguration of Jesus is an event reported by the Synoptic Gospels in which Jesus is transfigured upon a mountain. Why is this event lifted up and celebrated? Chuck will tell you.

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Pentecost, Sunday, May 19, 2013

pentecost320-crop

Pentecost is a Christian holy day that celebrates the coming of the Holy Spirit 40 days after Easter. Some Christian denominations consider it the birthday of the Christian church and celebrate it as such.

Originally, Pentecost was a Jewish holiday held 50 days after Passover. One of three major feasts during the Jewish year, it celebrated Thanksgiving for harvested crops. However, Pentecost for Christians means something far different.

Before Jesus was crucified, he told his disciples that the Holy Spirit would come after him:

And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another Counselor to be with you forever — the Spirit of truth. The world cannot accept him, because it neither sees him nor knows him. But you know him, for he lives with you and will be in you. I will not leave you as orphans; I will come to you. John 14:16–18

And 40 days after Jesus was resurrected (10 days after he ascended into heaven), that promise was fulfilled when Peter and the early Church were in Jerusalem for Pentecost.

Sunday’s Sermon:

Holy Spirit – Power for the JourneyActs 2: 1-13

We belive in the Holy Spirit, the 3rd person of the Trinity who came on Pentecost and began the church.  What does the Holy Spirit do today?  How does the  Holy Spirit get and find Power?

The Holy Spirit Comes at Pentecost

2 When the day of Pentecost came, they were all together in one place. Suddenly a sound like the blowing of a violent wind came from heaven and filled the whole house where they were sitting. They saw what seemed to be tongues of fire that separated and came to rest on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other tongues[a] as the Spirit enabled them.

Now there were staying in Jerusalem God-fearing Jews from every nation under heaven. When they heard this sound, a crowd came together in bewilderment, because each one heard their own language being spoken. Utterly amazed, they asked: “Aren’t all these who are speaking Galileans? Then how is it that each of us hears them in our native language? Parthians, Medes and Elamites; residents of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia,[b] 10 Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the parts of Libya near Cyrene; visitors from Rome 11 (both Jews and converts to Judaism); Cretans and Arabs—we hear them declaring the wonders of God in our own tongues!” 12 Amazed and perplexed, they asked one another, “What does this mean?”

13 Some, however, made fun of them and said, “They have had too much wine.”

Footnotes:

  1. Acts 2:4 Or languages; also in verse 11

  2. Acts 2:9 That is, the Roman province by that name

 

 
 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

 
%d bloggers like this: