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Monthly Archives: February 2021

Lent Quiz: How did the early church observe Lent?

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In addition to being a time to remember the mercy and forgiveness of Jesus, the early church used Lent to prepare converts for baptism, and to offer opportunities for those who had been separated from the church to be reconciled.

Today Lent remains an ideal time to remember our baptism and to reconcile relationships with those we may have harmed. All of this signifies to us our sinfulness and the sacrifice of Jesus which makes our forgiveness possible.

Watch a video about baptism in the United Methodist church.

Learn more about ancient traditions that still influence Easter.

Check out all our resources for Lent and Easter.

 
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Posted by on February 27, 2021 in Easter, Holidays, Lent, Pender UMC, Posts of Interest

 

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Lenten Hymn and Devotion, Week 1

 

Brian Stevenson, Pender UMC Director of Music, presents a series of hymn-based devotions on Wednesdays during Lent.

The first is Jesus Keep Me Near the Cross by Fanny Crosby

Jesus, keep me near the cross;

there a precious fountain,

free to all, a healing stream,

flows from Calvary’s mountain.

Refrain:

In the cross, in the cross,

be my glory ever,

till my raptured soul shall find

rest beyond the river.

The United Methodist Hymnal Number 301

Text: Fanny J. Crosby, 1820-1915

Music: William H. Doane, 1832-1915

Tune: NEAR THE CROSS, Meter: 76.76 with Refrain

 

 
 

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This is the Sign

 

At Pender’s 9:00 am Traditional and 11:15 am Common Ground Contemporary Services, Pastor Will White, continues the Lenten series “Rend Your Hearts: Claiming the Promise”.
The Message will be “This is the Sign” based on Genesis 9:8-17, 1 Peter 3:18-22 and Mark 1:9-15.
Lent began on Ash Wednesday; we admit that. But this first Sunday is when many people become aware of the season. If there are rituals to be adopted, they will often begin today. So, we are on the brink again, or still, or even for the first time, of the journey. That’s why we begin with promise; we begin with covenant.
Today we will also celebrate Scout Sunday and have a Blessing of the Bibles for First Grades
Watch the 9:00 Traditional Service

Attend the 11:15 Common Ground Contemporary Worship

 

 
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Posted by on February 20, 2021 in Holidays, Lent, Pender UMC, Posts of Interest

 

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Lent Quiz: True or False? Sundays are not counted in the 40 days of Lent

The correct answer is True.

Sundays in Lent are not counted in the forty days because each Sunday represents a “mini-Easter” and the reverent spirit of Lent is tempered with joyful anticipation of the Resurrection.

Lent is a season of forty days, not counting Sundays, which begins on Ash Wednesday and ends on Holy Saturday. Lent comes from the Anglo Saxon word lencten, meaning “lengthen” and refers to the lengthening days of spring. The forty days represents the time Jesus spent in the wilderness, enduring the temptation of Satan and preparing to begin his ministry.

Lent is a time of repentance, fasting and preparation for the coming of Easter. It is a time of self-examination and reflection. In the early church, Lent began as a period of fasting and preparation for baptism by new converts and then became a time of penance by all Christians. Today, Christians focus on relationship with God, growing as disciples and extending ourselves, often choosing to give up something or to volunteer and give of ourselves for others.

Sundays in Lent are not counted in the forty days because each Sunday represents a “mini-Easter.” This is why you will see the designation “Sunday in Lent” rather than “Sunday of Lent” in the naming of these Sundays. On each Lord’s Day in Lent, while Lenten fasts continue, the reverent spirit of Lent is tempered with joyful anticipation of the Resurrection.

 
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Posted by on February 20, 2021 in Easter, Holidays, Lent, Pender UMC, Posts of Interest

 

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When did United Methodists start the “imposition of ashes” on Ash Wednesday?

charles-wesley-emory-incorrect-revised

While many think of actions such as the imposition of ashes, signing with the cross, footwashing, and the use of incense as something that only Roman Catholics or high church Episcopalians do, there has been a move among Protestant churches, including United Methodists to recover these more multisensory ways of worship. This is in keeping with a growing recognition that people have multiple ways of learning and praying.

Worship that is oriented to the intellect or to the emotions, both interior, leaves out those who engage in prayer through vision, smell, touch, movement, and so forth. We are increasingly aware that people are formed in faith when practices become embedded in memory, nerves, muscles and bone through sensory engagement.

United Methodists have had resources for worship that include the imposition of ashes since 1979 when Ashes to Fire was published as Supplemental Worship Resource 8. This practice became part of our official worship resources in 1992 when General Conference adopted The United Methodist Book of Worship. See the service for Ash Wednesday, p. 321-324. It is, of course, optional and no congregation or individual is required to use it.

Other such practices were adopted in 1992. See The United Methodist Book of Worship for:

  • footwashing for Holy Thursday, p. 351-354
  • meditation at the cross for Good Friday, p. 363-364
  • incense for Evening Praise and Prayer, p. 574

This FAQ was prepared by Rev. Daniel Benedict, Center for Worship Resourcing, The General Board of Discipleship.

The original article is at http://www.umc.org/what-we-believe/when-did-united-methodists-start-the-imposition-of-ashes-on-ash-wednesday

 
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Posted by on February 17, 2021 in Holidays, Lent, Posts of Interest

 

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