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When did United Methodists start the “imposition of ashes” on Ash Wednesday?

charles-wesley-emory-incorrect-revised

While many think of actions such as the imposition of ashes, signing with the cross, footwashing, and the use of incense as something that only Roman Catholics or high church Episcopalians do, there has been a move among Protestant churches, including United Methodists to recover these more multisensory ways of worship. This is in keeping with a growing recognition that people have multiple ways of learning and praying.

Worship that is oriented to the intellect or to the emotions, both interior, leaves out those who engage in prayer through vision, smell, touch, movement, and so forth. We are increasingly aware that people are formed in faith when practices become embedded in memory, nerves, muscles and bone through sensory engagement.

United Methodists have had resources for worship that include the imposition of ashes since 1979 when Ashes to Fire was published as Supplemental Worship Resource 8. This practice became part of our official worship resources in 1992 when General Conference adopted The United Methodist Book of Worship. See the service for Ash Wednesday, p. 321-324. It is, of course, optional and no congregation or individual is required to use it.

Other such practices were adopted in 1992. See The United Methodist Book of Worship for:

  • footwashing for Holy Thursday, p. 351-354
  • meditation at the cross for Good Friday, p. 363-364
  • incense for Evening Praise and Prayer, p. 574

This FAQ was prepared by Rev. Daniel Benedict, Center for Worship Resourcing, The General Board of Discipleship.

The original article is at http://www.umc.org/what-we-believe/when-did-united-methodists-start-the-imposition-of-ashes-on-ash-wednesday

 
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Posted by on February 17, 2021 in Holidays, Lent, Posts of Interest

 

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Ash Wednesday – Yet Even Now

Ash Wednesday, February 17 at 7:00 pm

Dear Pender Friends,

I want to encourage you to participate in our “Ash Wednesday” livestream this Wednesday, February 17, at 7pm.

As always, we will be on YouTube, Facebook, and the church’s website and we’ll be returning to a presentation style that is more familiar to you. You might be asking, “Why do we need Lent this year?” With the pandemic, we’ve been through the “Lentiest Lent that has ever Lented”. As for self-reflection, “Just what do you think we were doing during the months we were on lock-down?”

But, maybe this year, more than ever, we need to focus on Jesus. We need to focus on the cross and the hope it brings. In the Lenten box delivered to your home, get your charcoal out and be ready at 7pm on Wednesday! I’ll provide instructions as to how to apply “the sign of the cross” during the livestream.

Grace and Peace,
Will

p.s. Children love symbols, so please include them. There will be a special “Time with Children” for them.


“Yet Even Now”

Worship Service, Time with Children, Sermon, Use of Ashes

(In your Lenten bag, there is some charcoal, please have it on hand when the service begins.  Please enjoy the soup supper before or after worship as a reminder to live simply during Lent.)

 

Adults, please listen for the answers to the following…

 

What is the significance of the ashes?

 

What kind of ashes do we use “normally”?

 

What does it mean to repent?

 

Why is that important?

 

Think about what YOU can do to participate in Lenten discipline this year.

 

Help children experience Ash Wednesday…

 

  • First, include them! Kid’s love symbols.  They get it!
  • Tell the children that they know the “brands” of their sneakers, backpacks, coats, etc. Ask them to tell you about their favorite brands…
    • Then say, “What does it mean to make the cross your ‘brand’ for life”?
  • Tell them, “From tonight until Easter Sunday (April 4th), we want to be the best followers of Jesus we can be.”
    • Ask them, “What should we do?”
    • Then ask, “What should we not do?”
  • Tell them that the sign of the ashes means, “You belong to Jesus.” Encourage them to wear the sign of the cross (charcoal) on their foreheads for the rest of the night.

 

 
 

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Ash Wednesday

Ash Wednesday Service and Spaghetti Dinner

Ash Wednesday marks the beginning of the season of Lent. It derives its name from the practice of placing ashes on the foreheads of adherents as a sign of mourning and repentance to God.

Our Ash Wednesday service will begin at 7:00 pm with Soup and a Discussion online.

And Chuck Knows Church says…

Ever seen a little smudge mark on someone’s forehead as they walk out of church? That’s a sign of the cross and it means it’s Ash Wednesday during Lent. Chuck tells you about this important worship service:

 
 

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A Souper Simple Supper – Ash Wednesday

 

A brief Ash Wednesday Service will be held online  at 7:00 pm.

Check out your Lenten Box for soup mix, a yummy roll recipe and discussion cards.

 

 
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Posted by on February 15, 2021 in Holidays, Lent, Pender UMC, Posts of Interest, Videos

 

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When did United Methodists start the “imposition of ashes” on Ash Wednesday?

charles-wesley-emory-incorrect-revised

While many think of actions such as the imposition of ashes, signing with the cross, footwashing, and the use of incense as something that only Roman Catholics or high church Episcopalians do, there has been a move among Protestant churches, including United Methodists to recover these more multisensory ways of worship. This is in keeping with a growing recognition that people have multiple ways of learning and praying.

Worship that is oriented to the intellect or to the emotions, both interior, leaves out those who engage in prayer through vision, smell, touch, movement, and so forth. We are increasingly aware that people are formed in faith when practices become embedded in memory, nerves, muscles and bone through sensory engagement.

United Methodists have had resources for worship that include the imposition of ashes since 1979 when Ashes to Fire was published as Supplemental Worship Resource 8. This practice became part of our official worship resources in 1992 when General Conference adopted The United Methodist Book of Worship. See the service for Ash Wednesday, p. 321-324. It is, of course, optional and no congregation or individual is required to use it.

Other such practices were adopted in 1992. See The United Methodist Book of Worship for:

  • footwashing for Holy Thursday, p. 351-354
  • meditation at the cross for Good Friday, p. 363-364
  • incense for Evening Praise and Prayer, p. 574

This FAQ was prepared by Rev. Daniel Benedict, Center for Worship Resourcing, The General Board of Discipleship.

The original article is at http://www.umc.org/what-we-believe/when-did-united-methodists-start-the-imposition-of-ashes-on-ash-wednesday

 
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Posted by on February 24, 2020 in Holidays, Lent, Posts of Interest

 

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